Harlow Judo Club
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       Child Protection

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  Child protection policy

As well as being very experienced judo coach Mick is also very well trained as a play worker with once again many years experience. His play work training involved extensive child protection education.  We are using the B.J.A. protection policy at the moment whilst our own policy is being developed.  From a personal point of view Mick would also put in VERBAL as a form of abuse.

CONTENT PAGE
Policy 3
Foreword 3
Principles 4
Our responsibilities 4
The Role of the BJA 5
The main forms of abuse 5
Recognition of abuse 8
Indications that a child is being abused 8
Listening to the child 9
Recording information 9
You have concerns – what happens now? 10
Allegations of abuse against members of staff and volunteers 11
What you need to do 12
What happens next? 12
Allegations of previous abuse 13
Basic guidelines to help safeguard children, staff, volunteers and the organisation 13
Recruiting and selecting staff and volunteers 13
Pre-selection checks 13
Policy and procedure 14
Training 14
Supervision 15
Complaints 15
Good practice in the care of children 15
Guidance for preventing abuse of Positions of trust 17
Use of photographic and filming equipment at competitions and events 18
Use of photographic and filming equipment as a coaching aid 21
Web site images 22
Guidance for the parent or guardian 22
Procedures for the BJA Working Party 24
Record of offenders 27
Responsibilities 27
Support to deal with the aftermath 28
Contact information 29
BJA Personal Disclosure Form Appendix 1
Photographic/Filming at events registration form Appendix 2
A quick Guide to Procedures Appendix 3
Child Protection Incident/Concern Record Form Appendix 4
Sample Photography/Film Consent Form Appendix 5
Video/Photography 3-Year Pass Application Form Appendix 6

3 CHILD PROTECTION

Appreciations

The British Judo Association wishes to express its appreciation to the following for their help and support in preparing and publishing these guidelines. Amateur Swimming Association National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children
NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit English Sports Council National Coaching Foundation/Sports Coach UK
British Weight Lifting Association English Squash

POLICY

The British Judo Association upholds the principle that all children whatever their age, culture, disability, gender, language, racial origin, religious belief and/or sexual identity have the right to protection from abuse. The members, staff and volunteers of the Association are committed to the welfare and protection of children so that they can enjoy sporting activities in safety without fear, threat or abuse.

FOREWORD
Everyone has a role to play in safeguarding children from abuse. Dealing with concerns about child abuse and particularly child sexual abuse can be very disturbing but stay calm and use this guide to help you decide what you need to do. Follow these procedures and together we can help to protect vulnerable children and young people and identify any poor practice that may be putting our players or coaches at risk.

It is widely accepted that it is the responsibility of every adult to protect children from abuse. Child abuse and particularly child sexual abuse can arouse strong emotions in those facing such a situation and it is important to understand these feelings and not allow them to interfere with your judgement about any action to take. Abuse can occur within many situations including the home, school and the sporting environment. Some individuals will actively seek employment or voluntary work with children in order to harm them. Everyone working in judo either in a paid of voluntary capacity, together with those working in affiliated organisations, has a role to play in
safeguarding the welfare of children and preventing their abuse.

4 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

PRINCIPLES

Children have a right to expect us to protect them from harm. By taking care to uphold these principles we can help to assure their welfare and development.

• The child’s welfare is paramount.

• All children whatever their age, culture, disability, gender, language, racial origin, religious belief and/or sexual identity 
  have the right to protection from buse.

• We will take seriously all suspicions and allegations of abuse and respond swiftly and appropriately.

• Anyone under the age of 18 years is considered as a child for the purposes of this document.

• We recognise that working in partnership with children and their parents/carers is essential for the protection of the
  children and are committed to working together with the Local Area Child Protection Committee (ACPC) and to complying
  with its procedures.

• We recognise the statutory responsibility of the Social Services Department to ensure the welfare of children.

• Regional areas, clubs and other organisations will be provided with the appropriate documentation and support to ensure
  that they are able to implement the Policy.

• Adults working with children are also provided with protection and are aware of good practice so they can be protected
  from wrongful allegations. It is a criterion that all clubs, regions and affiliated bodies require staff, coaches, officials,
  administrators, parents and participants adopt and abide by the British Judo Association’s Child Protection Policy and
  Procedures.

OUR RESPONSIBILITES

We recognise our responsibilities and will use our best efforts to promote good practice to protect children and reduce risk to our players and coaches. We recognise that we have a responsibility to:

• Safeguard and promote the interests and well-being of children with whom we are working.

• Take all reasonable practical steps to protect them from harm, discrimination, or degrading treatment and respect their
  rights, wishes and feelings.

• Confidentiality should be maintained in line with the Human Rights Act 2000 and the Data Protection Act 1988.
  Our child protection procedures are intended to:

• Offer safeguards to the children with whom we work, and to our members of staff, volunteers and those in affiliated
  organisations.

• Help to maintain professionalism and high standards of practice.

5 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

We recognise that any procedure is only as effective as the ability and skill of those who operate it. We are therefore committed to:

• Operating sound recruitment procedures.
• Providing support, appropriate training and adequate supervision to all our staff, coaches and officials so that they can
  work together with parents/carers and other organisations to ensure that the needs and the welfare of children
  remain paramount.

The Role of BJA will be as follows:

• To appoint a Lead Child Protection Officer
• To appoint a Disciplinary Panel when necessary
• To investigate all cases of poor practice that may be abuse and any allegations of abuse
• To provide support/training and guidance to the Child Protection Officers and clubs through recognised child protection
  organisations
• To make decisions on misconduct
• To inform all appropriate individuals and bodies of their decisions
• To facilitate training for Child Protection Officers/ Welfare Officers
• To keep a list of all suspended, disciplined and disqualified persons
• To monitor and evaluate the implementation of the policy

THE MAIN FORMS OF ABUSE

Physical Abuse

Where adults physically hurt or injure children by hitting, shaking, squeezing, burning and biting or by giving children alcohol, inappropriate drugs or poison. Attempted suffocation or drowning also comes within this category. In sports situations, physical abuse might occur when the nature and intensity of training disregards the capacity of the child’s immature and growing body.

Sexual Abuse

Girls and boys are abused by adults, both male and female, who use children to meet their own sexual needs.
Showing children pornographic material is also a form of sexual abuse. Judo may involve physical contact with children and this could potentially create situations where sexual abuse may go unnoticed. Also the power of the coach or teacher over young athletes, if misused, may lead to abusive situations developing.

6 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Emotional Abuse

Persistent lack of love and affection, where a child may be constantly shouted at, threatened or taunted which may make the child very nervous and withdrawn. Emotional abuse also occurs when there is constant overprotection, which prevents
children from socialising. Emotional abuse in sport might include situations where children are subjected to unrealistic pressure by the parent, coach or teacher, or bullied in order to consistently perform to high expectations. There have been a number of studies* which suggest children with disabilities are at increased risk of abuse through various factors such as stereo-typing, prejudice, discrimination, isolation, and a powerlessness to protect themselves, or to adequately communicate that abuse has occurred. Children from ethnic minorities, who may also be experiencing racial discrimination, may be doubly powerless. *Wescott, Helen ‘The Abuse of Children and Adults with Disabilities’ – publish
London NSPCC 1993

Neglect

Where adults fail to meet a child’s basic needs like food or warm clothing. Children might also be constantly left alone or unsupervised. Adults may also fail to, or refuse to, give children love and affection and this could also be seen to be emotional neglect. This occurs where there is a lack of care, supervision, protection or guidance and can be categorised as:

• Exposing children to unnecessary heat or cold conditions.
• Exposing children to a lack of food and water.
• Exposing children to unhygienic conditions.
• Exposing children to a lack of medical care.
• Non-intervention in incidents of bullying or taunting.

Bullying

It is important to recognise that in some cases of abuse, it may not always be an adult abusing a young person. It can occur that the abuser is a young person, for example in the case of bullying. Bullying can be defined as deliberate hurtful behaviour that can take its form both physically and verbally against another person, usually repeated over a period of
time, where it is difficult for those being bullied to defend themselves. Although anyone can be a target of bullying, the victim is usually shy, sensitive and perhaps anxious or insecure. Sometimes they are singled out for physical reasons,
overweight, physically small, having a disability or belonging to a different race, culture or religious belief.

7 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Bullies can be both male and female. Although bullying often takes place in schools, it does and can occur anywhere there is poor or inadequate supervision, on the way to /from school, at a sporting event, in the playground and in changing rooms. Bullies come from all walks of life; they bully for a variety of reasons and may even have been abused themselves. Typically bullies can have low self-esteem, be, aggressive, jealous and excitable. Crucially, they have learnt how to gain power over others. It occurs if someone regardless of age or gender:

• Name calls, teases, threatens, uses graffiti or gestures
• Intimidates, torments, ridicules or humiliates
• Hits, kicks or thieves
• Uses racist or homophobic taunts
• Is overly sarcastic to another person
• Uses unwanted physical contact or abusive comments

The competitive nature of sport makes it an ideal environment for the bully. The bully in sport can be:

• A parent who pushes too hard.
• A coach who adopts a win-at-all-costs philosophy.
• A player who intimidates others.
• An official who places unfair pressure on a person.

Coaches hold a position of power in the relationship with their athlete and must not abuse this position to bully children/ vulnerable young adults in their care. It is a requirement for all within BJA to ensure that there are sufficient mechanisms to
allow children to be able report instances of bullying. Accusations of bullying may occur when the coach is:

• Overly zealous
• Resorts to aggressive, physical or verbal behaviour
• Torments, humiliates or ignores his/her athlete

8 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

THE EFFECTS OF ABUSE

Abuse in all its forms can affect a child at any age. The effects can be so damaging, that if not treated, they may follow an individual into adulthood. For example, an adult who has been abused as a child may find it difficult, or impossible, to maintain a stable, trusting relationship; may become involved with drugs or prostitution; may attempt suicide, or may abuse a child in the future.

RECOGNITION OF ABUSE

We know we are not experts and the recognition of child abuse is not easy even for experts but if we have concerns we really need to do something about it. Even for those experienced in working with child abuse, it is not always easy to
recognise a situation where abuse may occur or has already taken place. We acknowledge that British Judo Association staff, coaches and officials whether in a paid or voluntary capacity, are not experts at such recognition.

INDICATIONS THAT A CHILD IS BEING ABUSED INCLUDE:

• Unexplained or suspicious injuries such as bruising, cuts or burns, particularly if situated on a part of the body not  
  normally prone to such injuries.
• An injury for which the explanation seems inconsistent.
• The child describes what appears to be an abusive act involving him/her.
• Someone else – a child or adult, expresses concern about the welfare of another child.
• Unexplained changes in behaviour – e.g. becoming very quiet, withdrawn, or displaying sudden outbursts of temper.
• Inappropriate sexual awareness.
• Engages in sexually explicit behaviour in games.
• Is distrustful of adults, particularly those with whom a close relationship will normally be expected.
• Has difficulty in making friends.
• Is prevented from socialising with other children.
• Displays variations in eating patterns including overeating or loss of appetite.
• Losses weight for no apparent reason.
• Becomes increasingly dirty or unkempt.

9 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

This list is not exhaustive and the presence of one or more of the indicators is not proof that abuse is actually taking place. It is not the responsibility of those working in judo to decide that child abuse is occurring, but it is their responsibility to act on any concerns.

Never assume that someone else has identified and acted on the problem. There may be other events happening in a child’s life which may be affecting their demeanour such as recent bereavement or change in family circumstances.
You should where possible work to identify possible causes in partnership with parents/carers.

LISTENING TO THE CHILD

If a child says or indicates that he or she is being abused, or information is obtained which gives concern that a child is being abused, the person receiving this information should:

• React calmly so as not to frighten the child.
• Tell the child they are not to blame and that it was right to tell.
• Take what the child says seriously, recognising the difficulties inherent in interpreting what is said by a child who has a
  speech disability and/or differences in language.
• Keep questions to the absolute minimum necessary to ensure a clear and accurate understanding of what has been
  said.
• Reassure the child, but do not make promises of confidentiality, which might not be feasible in the light of subsequent
  developments.
• Make a record of what has been said, heard and/or seen. Recording the Information – Keep it clear and simple
  Information may need to be passed to the Social Services Department or the police and, to be as helpful as possible, it
  should include:
• The nature of the allegation.
• A description of any visible bruising or other injuries.
• The child’s account, if he or she can give them, of what has happened and how any bruising or other injuries occurred.
• Any times, dates, or other relevant information.
• A clear distinction between what is fact, opinion, or hearsay.
• Do not delay reporting the matter by trying to obtain more information.

10 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

YOU HAVE CONCERNS – WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

You don’t have to take responsibility for deciding if child abuse is taking place or not but, if you have concerns; there are people who can help. It is not the responsibility of any one working under the auspices the British Judo
Association in a paid or voluntary capacity to decide whether or not child abuse is taking place. However, there is a responsibility to act on concerns to protect children in order that appropriate agencies can then make inquiries and take any necessary action to protect the child.The social services department has a statutory duty under the Children Act 1989 to ensure the welfare of a child. When a child protection referral is made its staff have a legal responsibility to make enquiries. This may involve talking to the child and family and gathering information from other people who know the child. Inquiries may be carried out jointly with the police where a crime against a child is alleged. There is always a commitment to work in partnership with parents or carers where there are concerns about their children. Therefore, in most situations, it would be important to talk to parents or carers to help clarify any initial concerns. For example, if a child seems withdrawn, they may have experienced bereavement in the family. However, there are circumstances in which a child might be placed at even greater risk were such concerns to be shared, e.g. where a parent or carer may be responsible for the abuse or not able to respond to the situation appropriately. In these situations, or where concerns still exist inform the Social Services
department as soon as possible. The Social Services department will decide how and when parents or carers will be informed. Keep a note of the name and designation of the Social Services member of staff or police officers to whom the concerns were passed, together with the time and date of your call. Wherever possible, write to them within 24 hours to confirm the details. Bring your concern to the attention of the person with designated responsibility for child protection:

• In a Club
If you are working within a club, you should inform the club welfare officer or person in charge if there is no club welfare officer in place. If you are the senior teacher or coach within the club then you will need to inform the club
chairman/president.

• In a School
If you are working with schools as part of the school curriculum you should inform the Teacher with designated responsibility for child protection.
• In a Local Authority scheme (or similar) If you are working within a recreational or play scheme you should inform the
manager of the scheme.

11 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines


• Working with players away from home If you are working with judo players away from home (for example at tournaments, training camps, clinics or festivals), then you should inform the team manager, senior coach or course director. It is the responsibility of these people to ensure that appropriate advice is obtained from the local Social Services department or the NSPCC.
• If your concern is about the person designated for child protection Contact your local Social Services department, the police or the NSPCC direct and tell them about your concerns. The telephone number for Social Services is usually included in the listing for your local council and the number of your local police station will also be listed in the telephone directory. The NSPCC operates a 24-hour free phone help line telephone number 0800-800-500, you do not have to give your name but it is helpful if you do. If you are unsure about contacting the Social Service departments, the police or the
NSPCC or if your concern is about risk due to poor practice, you can contact the BJA’s Child Protection Officer at the British Judo Association, Suite B, Loughborough Technology Park, Epinal Way, Loughborough LE11 3GE Tel: 01509 631670. ALLEGATIONS OF ABUSE AGAINST MEMBERS OF STAFF AND VOLUNTEERS Child abuse can and does occur outside the family setting. Although it is a sensitive and difficult issue, child abuse has occurred within institutions and may occur within other settings, for example, sport or other social activities. This could involve anyone working with children in a paid or voluntary capacity, for example: a volunteer in clubs, club helpers, tutors at training camps, clinics or
festivals and coaches. Recent inquiries indicate that abuse which takes place within a public setting, is rarely a one-off event**. It is crucial those those involved in judo are aware of this possibility and that all allegations are taken seriously and appropriate action taken. **’The Report of the Independent Inquiry into Multiple Abuse in Nursery Classes in Newcastle Upon Tyne’, Published – Newcastle City Council 1994. The person in charge may be informed of situations where it is unclear if the allegation constitutes abuse or not, and the action to be taken is not obvious. There may be circumstances where allegations are about poor practice rather than abuse but, where there is any doubt, the person in charge should seek advice from the Social Services department, the police, or the NSPCC. This is because it may be one of a series of other instances which together cause concern. It is acknowledged that feelings generated by the discovery that a member of staff or volunteer is, or may be abusing a child, will raise concerns among other staff or important that any concerns for the welfare of the child arising from abuse or harassment by a member of staff or volunteer should be reported immediately.

12 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

The British Judo Association will fully support and protect any member of staff or volunteer who, in good faith, reports his or her concern that a colleague is, or may be abusing a child.

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO

Any suspicion that a child has been abused by either a member of staff or a volunteer will be reported to the person in charge. The person in charge will refer the allegation to the social services department, who may involve the police. The person in charge should also notify the BJA’s Child Protection Officer. The parents or carers of the child will be contacted, as soon as possible, following advice from the social services department. Every effort should be made to ensure that confidentiality is maintained for all concerned and to protect the integrity of the investigation process. What happens next?
Where there is a complaint of abuse against a member of staff, there may be three types of investigation:

1. A criminal investigation
2. A child protection investigation
3. A disciplinary investigation by the BJA

The BJA will decide if an individual accused of abuse should be temporarily suspended from membership pending police and social services inquiries. Sometimes the authorities will not wish such action to be taken immediately so that
their inquiries are not jeopardised. The results of the police and social services investigation will inform the disciplinary
investigation. If the investigation shows that the allegation is clearly about poor practice then the person in charge will follow the BJA’s complaints or disciplinary procedure. If the allegation is about poor practice by the person in charge, or where the matter has been handled inadequately and concerns remain, you should contact the BJA’s Child Protection Officer who will follow the BJA’s complaints or disciplinary procedure. Irrespective of the findings of police or social services, the BJA will assess all individual cases under the appropriate complaints or disciplinary procedure to decide
if a member of staff or volunteer can be reinstated and how this can be sensitively handled. This may be a difficult decision, particularly where there is insufficient evidence to uphold any action by the police. In such cases, the Association must reach a decision based upon the information that is available which could suggest that on a balance of probability it is more likely than not that the allegation is true.

13 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

The welfare of the children should always remain paramount. Consideration should be given to what support may be appropriate to children, parents and members of staff. Allegations of Previous Abuse Allegations of abuse may be made some period of time after the event. For example, by an adult who was abused as a child by a member of staff who is still currently working with children. Where such an allegation is made, the same procedure should be followed. This is because other children, either within the sport or outside it, may be at risk from this perso  Anyone who has a previous criminal conviction for offences related to abuse is automatically excluded from working with children. BASIC GUIDELINES TO HELP SAFEGUARD CHILDREN, STAFF, VOLUNTEERS AND THE ORGANISATION Anyone may have the potential to abuse children in some way and it is important we take all reasonable steps to ensure that unsuitable people are
prevented from working with children. Recruitment and Selecting Staff and Volunteers It is essential that the same procedure is used consistently when recruiting and selecting staff or volunteers for paid or unpaid, full-time or part-time posts. Pre-selection checks should include the following: All staff and volunteers working for a club should complete a personal disclosure form including details any criminal record. (See Personal Disclosure form Appendix 1)

• Club rules should state that failure to disclose information will result in exclusion from the club and/or the BJA.
• Criminal Record Bureau background check should be obtained. Or sight of an Advanced Disclosure should be made. This Disclosure should be no more than six months old. From July 2001 the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) will provide a criminal record Disclosure Certificate in line with the Protection of Children Act of 1999. There are three levels of disclosure and the fees are £33 per check. Certificates are issued free for those who are volunteers. The BJA has registered with the CRB. Checks may be carried out with the following organisations that maintain information about Individuals who are deemed to be unsuitable to work with children:

• In England and Wales: Department of Health Consultancy Index
• DFES List 99
• In Scotland: The Scottish Office (Social Work Services Group)

14 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

• In Northern Ireland: The DHSS Pre-employment Consultancy Services (PECS) Checks against these registers are now done by the CRB. At least two references should be taken up and one should relate to previous work with children.
It is recommended that with any employment / deployment of coaches, voluntary or paid, that the club seek references and also contact BJA Head Office for confirmation of the Coach’s judo qualifications and if the person is under investigation. The BJA procedures for releasing information to clubs seeking references will be reviewed following the outcome of the Bichard Inquiry. Sir Michael Bichard is leading the inquiry, which is investigating the handling of information regarding Ian Huntley. Clubs must have effective measures in place to ensure the confidentiality and secure storage of information received in relation to applicants. The storage of this data is covered under the Data Protection Act 1988. For full details on the act contact the Data Protection Registrar. Information Commissioner Wycliffe House, Water Lane
Wilmslow Cheshire SK9 5AF Fax: 01625 524 510 Enquiry/Information Line: 01625 545 745 http://www.dataprotection.gov.uk/

Policy and Procedure

• Clubs should have a policy to protect children and keep them safe from harm.
• Everyone involved in the club should be made aware of the club policy to protect children and keep them safe from harm.
• The club policy and procedures should be easily accessible to everyone involved in the club.
• Everyone involved in the club should be made aware of the procedure to follow if there are concerns. Training Recruitment
  and selection process checks are only part of the process to protect children from possible abuse by coaches and
  administrators.
• Appropriate training should be provided for staff and volunteers so that they are aware of and sensitive to potentially
  abusive situations.

15 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Supervision Managers, senior staff and senior volunteers should be sensitive to child abuse issues.

• They should act on concerns at an early stage.
• They should offer appropriate support to those who report concerns.

Complaints

• The management committee of all clubs should ensure that there is a well established complaints procedure in operation and that parents and their children have the relevant information that will allow easy access to this procedure Whistle blowing where the allegation concerns child abuse is never easy and you should feel able to report any concerns without fear of reprisal. The BJA treats all issues concerning Child Protection with the utmost confidence. However you can if
you feel report the matter to any relevant body, Social Services, Police, NSPCC or BJA, who can deal with your concerns.
GOOD PRACTICE IN THE CARE OF CHILDREN You can reduce potential risk to children and help to protect staff and volunteers by promoting good practice in your club activities and environment. Always be publicly open when working with children.
• Avoid situations where a coach and individual players are completely unobserved.
• Coaches should refrain from demonstrating techniques with players under the age of 18. It is preferable for a coach to
  instruct two players to demonstrate the move by talking them through it. This is particularly applicable for groundwork.
  Physical contact between the coach and children should be minimised.
• Where any form of body contact is needed, ensure that it is appropriate and provided openly - particularly in groundwork
  situations. Always consider the views of the parents and carers as well as the child and make sure that your actions are
  not open to misinterpretation.
• Where possible parents should take on the responsibility for their children in the changing rooms.
• Where groups have to be supervised in the changing rooms always ensure that this is carried out by at least two male or
  two female staff appropriate to the sex of the group.
• It is not appropriate to allow mixed sex changing facilities.
• It is not appropriate for adults and children to share changing facilities unsupervised.

16 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

• It is not appropriate to allow mat side changing for adults and/or children.
• Always follow the BJA’s weighing-in procedure and ensure that male or female officials appropriate to the sex of the
  players carry this out. Appropriate screened or separated facilities should be provided. (See the BJA Tournament
  Handbook for full details or running BJA Tournaments)
• Where mixed teams travel away from home, both male and female members of staff should always accompany them.

  See also:
  NSPCC “Safe Sport Away – A Guide to Good Planning”
  NSPCC “Safe Sports Events” ISBN 1-84228-035-X
  http://www.thecpsu.org.uk
  Be aware ~ as a general rule it doesn’t make sense to:
• Spend excessive amounts of time alone with children away from others.
• Take children alone in car journeys, however short.
• Take children to your home where they will be alone with you. If a situation like this is unavoidable, make sure that the
  person in charge or the child’s parents or carers are fully aware and have given consent. And you should never:
• Engage in rough, physical or sexually provocative games, including horseplay.
• Share a room with a child.
• Allow or engage in inappropriate touching of any form.
• Allow children to use inappropriate language unchallenged.
• Make sexually suggestive comments to a child even in fun.
• Let allegations a child makes go unchallenged, unrecorded, or not acted upon.
• Do things of a personal nature that children can do for themselves.
• Have children stay at your home with you unsupervised.
• Abuse your privileged position of power or trust with children or adults.
• Cause a participant to lose self-esteem by embarrassing, humiliating or undermining the individual.
• Have favourites.

17 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

• Resort to bullying tactics, or verbal abuse.
• Agree to meet young athlete/vulnerable adult on your own. Just take care when children need your help It may sometimes be necessary for staff or volunteers to do things of a personal nature for children, particularly if they are young or are children with disabilities.
• Only carry out such tasks with the full understanding and consent of parents or carers of the child.
• If a child is fully dependant upon you, be responsive to them, talk with them about what you are doing and give them choices where possible particularly if you are involved in any dressing, or undressing or where there is physical contact to assist the child to carry out particular activities.
• If during your care of a child you accidentally hurt them or the child seems distressed in any manner or appears to be sexually aroused by your actions or misunderstands or misinterprets something you have done, report any such incident as soon as possible to another colleague and make a brief written note of it. Inform parents or carers about the incident as soon as possible. Guidance for Preventing Abuse of Positions of Trust This guidance is primarily intended to protect young people over the age of sexual consent but under the age of 18 years of age and vulnerable adults where a relationship of trust with an adult exists. Young people of 16 or 17 can legally consent to some types of sexual activity but they may still be relatively immature emotionally. It is essential that those who may be in a position of responsibility and trust recognise this vulnerability and ensure that it is not exploited. There is no simple definition of a vulnerable adult but again the position of trust and the vulnerability of adults must not be abused. The principles and guidance apply irrespective of sexual orientation; neither homosexual nor heterosexual relationships are acceptable in a position of trust. The Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 2000 contains a proposal that it would be unlawful for any sexual activity between a person in a position of trust and any person under the age of 18 years subject to their authority. A Relationship of Trust can be described as one in which one party is in a position of power or influence over another by virtue of their position. A genuine relationship
can start between two people within a relationship of trust but the relationship of trust must end before any sexual relationship develops. Abuse of trust and sexual or other abuse Any sexual activity, which is not freely consenting, is criminal. The sexual activity covered by abuse of trust may be ostensibly consensual, bur rendered unacceptable because of the relative power positions of the parties concerned.

18 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Code on Abuse of Trust

The Code of Conduct on sexual activity between individuals in a relationship of trust aims to:

• Protect a young person or vulnerable adult from an unequal and potentially damaging relationship.
• Protect the person in a position of trust by preventing him/her from entering into such a relationship deliberately or 
  accidentally by providing clear and enforceable guidance on what behaviour is acceptable The BJA Code on abuse of
  Trust:
• Any behaviour, which might allow a sexual relationship to develop between the person in a position of trust and the individual or individuals in their care, must be avoided.
• Any sexual relationship within a relationship of trust is unacceptable so long as the relationship of trust continues.
• All those in an organisation have a duty to raise concerns about behaviour by coaches, staff, volunteers, managers and
  others, which may be harmful to those in their care, without prejudice to their own position.
• Allegations relating to a breach of the code on trust will be investigated according to the BJA complaints and disciplinary
  procedures. Use of Photographic and Filming equipment at Competitions and events

Principles

The British Judo Association is committed to providing a safe environment for children/young people under the age of 18. Essential to this commitment, is to ensure that all necessary steps are taken to protect children/young people from the inappropriate use of their images in resource and media publications, on the Internet, and elsewhere.

Key Concerns

There have been concerns about the risks posed directly and indirectly to children and young people through the use of photographs on judo web sites and other publications. By adopting the points highlighted in these guidelines, you will be
putting into place the best possible practice to protect children/young people wherever and whenever photographs and recorded images are taken and stored. These guidelines focus on the following key areas:
• The publishing of photographic and/or recorded images of children/young people
• The use of photographic filming equipment at judo events
• The use of video equipment as a coaching aid

19 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

And adopt the following key principles:
• The interests and welfare of children taking part in Judo are paramount
• Parents/carers and children have a right to decide whether children’s images are to be taken, and how those images may
  be used
• Parents/carers and children must provide written consent for children’s images to be taken and used
• Images should convey the best principles and aspects of judo, such as fairness and fun
• Care should be taken to ensure that images are not sexual or exploitative in nature, nor open to obvious misinterpretation
  and misuse
• Images should only be taken by authorised persons, as agreed in the protocol for a particular event
• All images of children should be securely stored
• In the case of images used on web-sites, particular care must be taken to ensure that no identifying details facilitate
  contact with a child by a potential abuser Publishing Images - Easy Rules to Remember:
• Ask for written permission from the player and carer/s to take and use their image. This ensures that they are aware of
  the way the image is intended to be used to represent the sport. The Consent Form is one way of achieving
  this.
• If the player is named, avoid using their photograph
• If a photograph is used, avoid naming the player. And NEVER publish personal details (email addresses, telephone
  numbers, addresses etc) of a child/young person
• Only use images of players in suitable dress (Tracksuit, full judogi i.e. Tshirt/ shorts/skirt, off mat clothing) to reduce the
  risk of inappropriate use
• Try to focus on the activity rather than a particular child and where possible use photographs that represent the broad
  range of children/young people taking part in Judo. This might include:

o Boys and girls
o Ethnic minority communities
o Children/young people with disabilities

Ensure that images reflect positive aspects of children’s involvement in judo (enjoyment/competition etc)
Use of Photographic Filming Equipment at Judo Events British Judo does not want to prevent carers or other spectators being able to take legitimate photographs or video footage of competitors. However, there is evidence that certain individuals will visit sporting events to take inappropriate photographs or video footage of children/young people. All Clubs and Areas should be vigilant about this possibility. Any concerns during an event should be reported to the Club/Area
Child Officer or the Tournament Controller.

20 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

If you are commissioning a photographer or inviting the press to an event, it is important that they understand your expectations of them in relation to child protection. You should:

• Inform players and carers that a photographer will be in attendance at an event and ensure they consent to both the
  taking and publication of films or photographs
• Ensure that a system is introduced to ensure that press photographers are made aware of those children/young people  
  without consent for images to be taken.
• Provide a clear brief about what is considered appropriate in terms of content and behaviour
• Issue the photographer with identification which must be worn at all times
• Do not allow unsupervised access to players or one to one photo sessions at events
• Do not approve/allow photo sessions outside the events or at a players home If carers or other spectators are intending to
  photograph or video at an event they should also be made aware of your expectations:
• Carers and spectators should be asked to register at an event if they wish to use photographic equipment including
  mobile phones with photographic technology
• Players and spectators should be informed that if they have concerns they can report these to the organiser
• Concerns regarding inappropriate or intrusive photography should be reported to the event organiser or official, and
  recorded in the same manner as any other child protection concern Professional photographers/ filming / video operators
  wishing to record the event should seek accreditation with the event organiser by producing their professional
  identification for the details to be recorded. Ideally they should request this at least 5 working days before the event.
  Students or amateur photographers / film / video operators wishing to record the event should seek accreditation with the
  event organiser by producing their student or club registration card and a letter from their club / educational establishment
  outlining their motive for attending the event. All other spectators wishing to use photographic / film / video equipment
  should register their intent with the promoter of the event. Accreditation procedure: a system should be established
  whereby a record should be made of the individual's name and address and club. Professionals should register prior to
  the event and their identification details also recorded. Ideally

21 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

identification details should be checked with the issuing authority prior to the event. On registering, organisers of events should consider issuing an identification label on the day which can serve to highlight those who have accreditation. Where regular events occur, the identifying label should be changed to prevent unofficial replication. The British Judo Association will be launching a national video/photographic accreditation scheme in April 2004. Full details and an application form will be available from our web site www.britishjudo.org.uk and BJA Head Office. Public Information: the specific details concerning photographic / video and filming equipment registration should, where possible, be published prominently in event programmes and announced over the public address system prior to the start of the event. These restrictions apply to all competitions and gradings. The recommended wording is: In line with the British Judo Association Child Protection Policy, the organisers of this event request that any person wishing to engage in any video or photography must
register their details with staff at the tournament control desk before carrying out any such photography. Registration form - Appendix 2 Use of Photographic and Filming Equipment as an aid to Coaching The BJA acknowledges that videos can be a legitimate coaching aid for coaches and wants to ensure that this training medium can be used to help a child’s skill
development within the sport. Through this policy the BJA aims to protect Children and vulnerable adults from those people wishing to take photographs and video footage for inappropriate use. However, if it is to be used make sure that children and their parents/carers have given written consent, and understand that it is part of the coaching programme. Make sure that the films are then stored safely. This could be rolled into the consent on the registration form • Ensure that the performers and their parents/carers are aware of the purpose of the filming as a coaching aid. You must obtain consent in writing from parents/legal guardians before filming/photographing a child.
Sample Consent form – Appendix 5

• Ensure that the person designated for participants welfare and one other responsible and approved adult is present to
  ensure that performers are protected against inappropriate filming.
• Care should be taken to securely store the video materials to avoid inappropriate usage.

22 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Web Site Images

There have been concerns about the risks posed directly to children and vulnerable adults through the use of photographs on sports web sites. Photographs can be used as a means of identifying children when they are accompanied with personal information, e.g. This is x who likes to play the violin, this information can make a child vulnerable to an individual who may wish to start to ‘groom’ that child for abuse. Secondly the content of the photo can be used or adapted for inappropriate use and there is evidence of the adapted material finding its way onto child pornography sites.
The BJA advocate these guidelines:

• Avoid the use of the first and surname of the individuals in a photograph an easy rule to remember is:
o If the athlete is named avoid using their photograph.
o If the photograph is used avoid naming the athlete.
• Written parental permission to use an image of a young person. This ensures that parents are aware of the way the
  image of their child is representing Judo.
• Ask the players permission to use their image. This ensures that they are aware of the way that the image of them is
  being used to represent Judo.
• Only use athletes in suitable dress to reduce the risk of inappropriate use. Guidance for the parent or Guardian A good
  coach will develop a strong trusting bond with his/her athlete and this is essential in a successful coach player
  relationship. However as a parent you should check that:
• The club/organisation has a published Child Protection Policy which ensures that the children and participants are
  protected and kept from harm.
• There are procedures and a Child Protection Officer in place through which you can voice concerns.
• Coaches and volunteers are carefully recruited and suitably qualified. The coach in charge must have a minimum
  qualification of BJA Club Coach Award
• Have the coaches been screened to ensure suitability to work with children
• Are there suitable procedures for intimate care needs for children and disabled people: Routines for the use of toilet
  facilities and supervising.
• Does the club offer regular training to staff and volunteers?

23 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines
• Are there rules regarding arrangements for travelling to events?
• Are parents discouraged from watching or becoming involved? Encourage your children to talk to you about their training and ensure that they know how to voice their concerns if they are not happy about any situations that may arise.

24 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Procedures for BJA Child Working Party

Because of the sensitive nature of this kind of action and in order to protect and shield children and vulnerable adults from the traumas and rigors of formal disciplinary hearing BJA will use the following procedures depending on the circumstances involved. The Child Protection Working Party will appoint a Disciplinary Panel when deemed necessary. Reports of alleged misconduct, including those arising from a person’s club, from court appearances or from actions by employers are likely to cover a wide variety of behaviours. Each case will thus be considered on its unique merits by the Child Protection Working Party as to whether misconduct has occurred. If it is decided that the behaviour does not by itself call into question suitability for the particular role, no further action will be taken by BJA other than to formally advise the person of the receipt of a report and the decision made. The recipient shall have the right to make immediate written representations or reserve that right should he/she be reported for misconduct on a subsequent occasion. The BJA also reserve the right on receiving a second report, to take into account the facts of prior submissions. If it is found that the report raises a question about a person’s suitability within the sport, the BJA Child Protection Working Party shall proceed as follows:

• The accused will be advised of the receipt of a report and of the BJA’s knowledge of any related disciplinary hearings or legal and /or employment proceedings. The BJA will inform whether the BJA has decided to temporarily suspend the accused individual pending further inquiries and the BJA will inform the area/club/affiliated organisation as necessary.
• Once all inquiries have been completed the accused will be provided with copies of all reports made to the BJA.
• The accused will be asked to provide a written explanation supported, if he or she wishes by further representations, references or testimonials from those whose knowledge of the person is relevant. All reports will be presented to a panel comprising of not less than five people. The panel shall be comprised as follows:

Group A

At least Two Members (maximum four) to be drawn from any of the following groups:
• Board of Directors – Any member of the Board but not the Chair (pool of 7)
• BJA Chief Executive Officer (pool of 1)

25 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines
The panel of five can have up to four members from group A but is limited to a maximum of three members from group B. The amount of people required from group B will be lowered in the instance from three or more panel
members being drawn from Group A.

Group B

Three members to be drawn from the following groups:
• BJA Complaints & Conduct Panel (not including the Chair of the Panel who is a member of the Child Working Party)
• BJA Area Chairman
• BJA Council Members
Panel members will not be drawn from the same geographical area as the accused. The panel has the authority under the British Judo Association Articles to impose any penalties they see appropriate. The accused may if they wish give verbal evidence or representation to the Panel. A friend, relative, official representing the person’s professional body or legal
representative may accompany the accused. When representations have been completed the Panel shall decide whether the individual is unsuitable for the position he/she holds and if so, whether he/she, will be suspended or expelled from the membership. The accused shall be notified by the Panel in writing of the restrictions imposed. This information will be copied to the BJA Child Protection Officer who will inform the Club, Area and other bodies as deemed appropriate.
Should the decision be that the behaviour fell short of the expected standards, but there is no need for any barring, the Panel shall in writing issue a warning as to future conduct and levy restrictions and/or criteria upon that person remaining in place, e.g. further training to be undertaken or a period where the person is supervised. The BJA and all member clubs, areas and affiliated organisations shall respect and enforce the sanctions imposed by other sporting governing bodies for similar misconduct.

26 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Appeals

The accused has the right to appeal any penalty imposed by the panel. Appeals must be received by the British Judo Association Chief Executive Officer within 7days of notification of the Panel’s original decision and must clearly state the grounds on which the appeal is being made and an appeal fee of £50.00 must accompany this letter. This appeal fee will be refunded in the event that the appeal is successful. The Appeal Panel may in certain circumstances refund all or part of the appeal fee in the event of the appeal being denied under special circumstances The appeal panel will be comprised as follows: Group A At least Two Members (maximum four) to be drawn from any of the following
groups:
• Board of Directors – Any member of the Board but Appeal Panel must contain the Chair of the Association (pool of 8)
  The panel of five can have up to four members from group A but is limited to a maximum of three members from group B.
  The amount of people required from group B will be lowered in the instance from three or more panel

  members being drawn from Group A. Group B Three members to be drawn from the following groups:
• BJA Complaints & Conduct Panel (not including the Chair of the Panel who is a member of the Child
  Working Party)
• BJA Area Chairman
• BJA Council Members
Appeal Panel members will not be drawn from the same area as the accused nor shall any person who served on the original panel be included on the Appeal Panel. The panel may refer details of people considered unsuitable to work with
children/vulnerable adults to the at risk register.

27 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Confidentiality

Every effort will be made to ensure that confidentially is maintained for all concerned.Information should be handled and disseminated on a need to know basis only. This includes the following people:
• The BJA Child Protection Officer.
• The parents of the person who is alleged to have been abused.
• The person making the allegation.
• Social services/police.
• Designated officers within the governing body of BJA e.g. Legal Adviser, BJA Child Protection Working Team.
• The alleged abuser (and parents if the alleged abuser is a child). Information will be stored centrally at BJA’s Head Office in a secure place with limited access to the designated people, in line with the Data Protection Act of 1984, that information is accurate, regularly updated, relevant and secure. Notification The BJA shall notify the Club of the individual who made the accusations and the club to which the accused belongs, local social services department and any sporting
professional body to which the accused belongs shall be notified of the outcome. Record of Offenders The BJA shall keep a confidential record of offenders who have been disciplined, barred, restricted or warned. All affiliated organisations, areas and/or clubs shall have the right to have the record checked by written request. Access to the list shall be restricted to designated people (BJA Child Protection Working Party). The BJA will refer details of any person who the BJA considers unsuitable to work with children to the Protection of Children Act List (POCA, Dept of Health) for their consideration as to whether the person’s details should be included on the list. All records will be kept secured at BJA Head Office.
Responsibilities The BJA will not accept responsibility for any fees, expenses or other costs incurred by either or any party bringing or defending the action and shall have no liability to award any compensation for harm done or suffering by either party

28 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Support to deal with the Aftermath
• Consideration should be given to what support may be appropriate to the children, parents and members of staff. The use of help lines, support groups and open meetings will maintain an open culture and help the healing process. The British Association of Counselling Directory may be a useful resource in this area to use.
• Consideration should be given about what support may be appropriate to the alleged perpetrator of the abuse.

29 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

CONTACT DETAILS

Social Services
The telephone number for Social Services is usually included in the listing for your local council.
Police
The number of your local police station will also be listed in the telephone directory.
NSPCC
The NSPCC operates a 24-hour free phone help line telephone number 0800-800-500, you do not have to give your name but it is helpful if you do.
British Judo Association, Suite B, Loughborough Technology Park, Epinal Way,
Loughborough LE11 3GE Tel: 01509 631670 Fax: 01509 631680
e-mail: bja@britishjudo.org.uk website: www.britishjudo.org.uk

30 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines
APPENDIX 1
CONFIDENTIAL
PERSONAL DISCLOSURE FROM ALL VOLUNTEERS
WORKING WITH CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE


The British Judo Association is committed to the welfare and protection of children. Anyone holding a position of authority within the BJA or at a BJA club is required to completed a personal disclosure form. We all take our responsibilities towards the welfare of young players very seriously and, as a national governing body, we are required to demonstrate that we do so. With effect from January 2001, members need only update their personal disclosure forms every five years or if the details change; this will include any change of address. The date the form was completed will be recorded on the member’s personal licence record and a reminder sent out for an update after five years. Any correspondence relating to personal disclosure should be addressed in confidence to the membership secretary at head office. Child protection in relation to sport remains the subject of consideration by the authorities and agencies and, in the interests of best practice, we will continue to take appropriate advice and to adjust our procedures when necessary in order to maintain our high standards of care. Have you ever been convicted of any criminal offences? YES/NO
If YES, please supply details of any criminal convictions:
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
NOTE: You are advised under the provisions of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (exemptions) order 1975 as amended the Rehabilitations of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions Amendment Order 1986 ) you should declare all convictions including technically spent convictions, cautions, written warnings and reprimands. Hare you a person know to any Social Services department as being an actual or potential risk to children? YES/NO
If YES, please supply details:
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
……………………………………………………………………………………………………
Have you had a disciplinary sanction (from a sports or other organizations governing body) relating to child abuse? YES/NO
If YES, please supply details:
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
…………………………………………………………………………………………..
……………………………………………………………………………………………………

31 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines APPENDIX 1 Continued

Declaration

I declare that the information I have given is correct and I undertake to inform the Head of Member Services of the BJA of any changes within 10 days of occurrence. Completed form may be enclosed with club application form or sent direct in confidence to the Head of Member Services, BJA, Suite B, Loughborough Technology Park, Epinal Way, Loughborough LE11 3GE.

Signed
Date
Name Please print
Any surname previously known by, Please print
Address
Postcode
Date of Birth
Place of Birth
BJA Club Name
Number

32 Appendix 2 British Judo Association – Video Usage Registration Form

Event Name
Event Date
Applicant
Name
Official Use only
Type of Identification document provided (if applicable)
Requests to provide identification are at the discretion of the event organiser.
Address
Parent Press Coach Other
Players Name
(If you are filming many players on behalf of your club simply state the number of players you will be filming)
Reason for Filming/photography*
Childs/Children’s
Name

etails
I confirm that the information I have provided is to the best of my knowledge correct. I agree to abide by the British Judo
Association guidelines on video/camera usage at judo events.
Applicant signature: Date:

NOTES
The Tournament Organiser reserves the right to refuse permission to video/photograph at this event. This form is not required for general photography but must be completed if you intend to use telescopic or zoom lens. Please note
that regardless of the equipment used children should not be filmed/photographed outside of contest situations without the express permission of their parent/legal guardian or person acting in loco parentis.
This form does not need to be sent to BJA Head Office, however event organisers should keep these forms, as they will be
requested by the BJA in the event of a complaint/query.
Requests to see identification documentation are at the discretion of the Event Organiser. It is recommended that organisers’
request sight of press ID cards for press applicants.
For the purpose of these forms a child constitutes a player under the age of 18.
TEAR OR CUT ALONG THIS LINE
VIDEO/CAMERA USAGE CONFIRMATION OF REGISTRATION
……………………………….. (name) has registered to film at ……………….…………………… (event name)
on …………………. (event date).
The above named person has registered as a ………………………………………(parent/coach/press/other)
Event organiser signature: Date:
Slip to be produced by applicant on request during this event.

33 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

Appendix 3

A Quick Guide to Procedures

This quick guide is designed to advise on the most appropriate action to be taken if you suspect abuse outside of the sport of judo, for example by a child’s family or in their community. CONFIDENTIALITY ON A NEED TO KNOW BASIS MUST BE MAINTAINED UNTIL THE OUTCOME OF THE INVESTIGATION IS RELEASED
British Judo Association
Suite B, Loughborough Technology Park
Epinal Way, Loughborough LE11 3GE
Tel: 01509 631670 Fax:01509 631680
bja@britishjudo.org.uk
www.britishjudo.org.uk
Don’t delay in reporting your concerns. If concerned about a child Report your concern to the person with designated for Child Protection. Record what the child has said or what has been seen. With dates and times if possible. Copies of this report must be forwarded to Social Services within 24 hrs. If you are concerned about the parent/carer -
Inform the Social Services or Police who will advise on who should contact the parents or carers
Report the matter to BJA Child Protection Officer

34 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

A quick guide to procedures

This guide is designed to advise on the most appropriate action to be taken if you suspect abuse, serious
poor practice or breach of the code of ethics where incidents alleged to have been committed by a BJA
Member/Staff Member/Volunteer at a judo class or event. If concerned about the behaviour of a colleague
If it is serious poor practice or a breach of the Code of Ethics. If it is considered to be possible abuse. Report concerns to the person designated responsible for Child Protection who must then ensure the safety of the children and refer to Social Services who may involve the Police. Inform the BJA Child Protection Officer. The BJA Child Protection Officer will investigate the allegation and will apply the Complaints and Disciplinary Procedures accordingly. The BJA Child Protection Officer (CPO) will make an initial recommendation to the Chairman of the BJA Complaints & Conduct Commission whether a member should be suspended pending the outcome of any investigations /disciplinary procedures. The Chairman of the BJA Complaints & Conduct Commission will follow the CPO recommendations unless the recommendations are deemed unlawful or against the laws of natural justice. If concern relates to the person designated responsible for Child Protection - refer the matter to the BJA Child Protection Officer who will notify the Social Services. Delays in notifying the correct authorities put children at risk. If you are unable to contact the BJA Child Protection Officer report your concerns to the Police or Social Services and inform the BJA Child Protection Officer at the earliest opportunity

35 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines
Appendix 4

British Judo Association, Suite B, Loughborough Technology Park, Epinal Way,
Loughborough LE11 3GE Tel: 01509 631670 Fax: 01509 631680
email: bja@britishjudo.org.uk website: www.britishjudo.org.uk
Child Protection
Incident Record Form
YOUR NAME:
YOUR POSITION:
CHILDS NAME:
CHILDS ADDRESS:
PARENTS/CARERS NAMES AND ADDRESS:
ETHNIC GROUP - Please choose the category that best describes the Childs ethnic group from the following list and tick the appropriate box A1. British A2. Irish A.3 Any other White background (please write in)
B1. White and Black
Caribbean
B2. White and Black
African
B3. White and Asian B4. Any other Mixed background
(please write in)
C1. Indian C2. Pakistani C3. Bangladeshi C4. Any other Asian background
(please write in)
D1. Caribbean D2. African D3. Any other Black background
(please write in)
E1. Chinese E2. Any Other background
(please write in)
DISABILITY - The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 defines a disabled person as anyone with a “physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long term adverse effect upon his/her ability to carry out normal Day-to-day activities. Please choose the description that best describes the nature of the Childs disability and tick the appropriate
box.
A. Visually Impaired
B. Hearing Impaired C. Physical Disability
D. Learning Disability
E. Multiple Disability F. Other (please write in)
CHILDS DATE OF BIRTH:
DATE AND TIME OF ANY INCIDENT:
YOUR OBSERVATIONS:

36 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines

State exactly what the child said and what you said:
(Remember - do not lead the child - record actual details. Continue on separate sheet if necessary).
Action taken so far: Statement of concerns (section to be completed where no allegations have been made but you
have concerns to record) Please state the nature of your concerns and any other relevant information:

37 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines
External agencies contacted:
Details
POLICE Yes/No
If yes - which:
Name and contact number:
Details of advice received:
SOCIAL SERVICES Yes/No
If yes - which:
Name and contact number:
Details of advice received:
BJA Child Protection Officer
Yes/No
Name and contact number:
Details of advice received:
LOCAL AUTHORITY Yes/No
If yes - which:
Name and contact number:
Details of advice received:
OTHER (e.g. NSPCC)
Which:
Name and contact number:
Details of advice received:
Signature:
Print Name:
Date:
NB A copy of this form should be sent to Social Services after the telephone report. Remember to maintain confidentiality on a need to know basis - only if it will protect the child. Do not discuss this incident with anyone other than those who need to know.

38 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines
Appendix 5

Sample consent form for the use of photographs or video. (Parents and children) (Club or organisation) recognises the need to ensure the welfare and safety of all young people in sport. In accordance with our child protection policy we will not permit photographs, video or other images of young people to be taken without the consent of the parents/carers and children. The (Club or organisation) will follow the guidance for the use of photographs a copy of which is available
from British Judo Association. The (Club or organisation) will take all steps to ensure these images are used solely for the purposes they are intended. If you become aware that these images are being used inappropriately you should inform
(Club or organisation) immediately. I (parent/carer) consent to (club/organisation) photographing or videoing (insert name)
Signed: Date:
I (insert name of child) consent to (Club or organisation) photographing or videoing my involvement in
(sport)
Signed: Date:
 

39 British Judo Association – Child Protection Procedures & Guidelines
British Judo Association
Video/Photography 3-Year Pass Application Form
Suite B, Loughborough Technology Park, Epinal Way, Loughborough LE11 3GE
Applicants First
Name
Applicants
Surname
Address:
Postcode:
Date of Birth
REASON FOR VIDEO/PHOTOGRAPHY
Please tick the category that applies to you and provide the information on the right
hand side that is required for each category.
Category Tick
Extra required information
Parent/Guardian
Childs/Children’s
Names
Coach
* Please note that
coaches should check
their Coach
Accreditation Pass. If it
states Video and
Photography
Registered you do not
need to apply for this
pass in addition.
Club/s Name/s
Club Video/
photographer
Club PR Officer
Club Web Master
Club/s Name/s
Other
Please specify details

I confirm that the information I have provided is to the best of my knowledge correct. I agree to abide by the British
Judo Association guidelines on video/camera usage at judo events. Applicants signature: Date:
Documents that must be sent with this application
• A passport sized photo
• £1.50 processing fee – Cheques and Postal Orders payable to the British Judo Association.


           

 

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